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Lab Sciences Students Display Research

Edward McVoy explains his team’s research project to judges during the Department of Laboratory Sciences Research Day.

Edward McVoy explains his team’s research project to judges during the Department of Laboratory Sciences Research Day.

Students in the Laboratory Sciences programs of the College of Health Professions observed Allied Health Professions Week with a Nov. 6 display of research projects highlighting the varied and critical contributions to patient care by those in clinical laboratories.

Fifteen posters, representing individual and team research projects by 37 students in medical laboratory sciences and cytotechnology, filled the atrium of the Wilson Education Building.

Fifteen posters were displayed, representing individual and team projects by 37 students in the medical laboratory sciences and cytotechnology programs.

Fifteen posters were displayed, representing individual and team projects by 37 students in the medical laboratory sciences and cytotechnology programs.

“Every year our students must prepare a research project and this research day offered us a way to showcase their work and celebrate the role of laboratory sciences in the allied health professions,” said Catherine Smith, an instructor in the laboratory sciences program.

The team of Adrian Jones, Hua Yan and Edward McVoy evaluated the value of point-of-care testing, or lab tests that can be performed at a patient’s bedside versus sending samples to the central lab.

“We compared the cost, time and accuracy of point-of-care tests compared to those done at the lab,” said Jones, who started as an undergraduate in engineering before ultimately winding up in the lab sciences. “My best subject was biology and microbiology.”

McVoy noted the career potential for lab scientists: “There are clinical labs everywhere — not just in hospitals.”

Kaleigh Foster, a cytotechnology student whose project examined lung cancer in people who had never smoked, also pointed to an early interest in biology that led her to the program. “I was always interested in biology…always interested in cells and in particular the role of cells in causing cancer.”

Students recognized by a three-judge panel for their projects included:

  • Jeri Byrd — “Are the current guidelines for cervical cancer screening beneficial for women under 21 or over 65 years old?”
  • Jennifer Ball, Jesse Jacobs, Felicia Walker — “The role of medical laboratory scientists in interprofessional health care: replacing errors with teamwork”
  • Adrian Jones, Hua Yan, Edward McVoy — “Evaluating point of care testing as a potential auxiliary to central laboratory testing”
  • Erin Moore, Hailey Mortenson — “Congenital erythropoietic porphyria: a comparison of treatment by bone marrow transplant and target gene therapy”
  • Chelsea Washington, Kelly Virbel, Alicia Turner, Kyle Vallely — “Facilitating laboratory test result interpretation among medical professions in student-run clinics”
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