UAMS.EDU

UAMS Respiratory Care Students Take Top Two Spots in Quiz Contest

Nov. 6, 2014 | When it came down to the final two teams of respiratory care students from programs around Arkansas, competing recently in the annual quiz bowl-style contest known as the Sputum Bowl, the teams almost didn’t want to compete for the trophy — both teams were from the UAMS College of Health Professions.

Members of the two UAMS teams pose with their trophies, including (from left) Moises Ramos, Amanda Mayar, Tianyuan Yao, Debi Abner, Philip String and Jana Ward.

Members of the two UAMS teams pose with their trophies, including (from left) Moises Ramos, Amanda Mayar, Tianyuan Yao, Debi Abner, Philip String and Jana Ward.

“Going into the final round, it was still anyone’s contest to win and we knew it would be difficult to go against our own, so the victory was bittersweet in that regard,” said student Philip String, a senior in the program who also is the class president.

String and teammates Jana Ward and Tianyuan Yao emerged victorious in the competition, held during the Arkansas Society Respiratory Care October annual meeting. Taking second place was the team of Debi Abner, Amanda Mayer, Moises Ramos, also from the UAMS respiratory care program.

“We expect our students to perform well and they certainly delivered,” said Heather Neal-Rice, M.Ed., director of clinical education and an associate professor in the program. “They were most impressive on some of the complicated application questions and the neonatal-pediatric content.

The two UAMS teams prepare to compete in the Sputum Bowl finals.

The two UAMS teams prepare to compete in the Sputum Bowl finals.

Teams from nine of the 10 respiratory care programs in Arkansas responded to questions in content-specific categories by ringing a buzzer. If correct, the team earned a point.  If incorrect, the opposing team had an opportunity to answer the question. During the final two-minute penalty phase, teams lost a point for incorrect responses.

The Sputum Bowl is named for the mixture of saliva and mucus coughed up from the respiratory tract. While the competition is friendly and fun, String said the experience does help the students.

“I feel like this event will help me be a better respiratory therapist because it made me think outside the box and learn to rely on my fellow teammates,” he said. “This is crucial in a discipline where someone’s life is in your hands, and being able to recognize your strengths as well as your weaknesses is so important.”

String and his first place team plan to compete in the National Sputum Bowl Competition to be held in December at the American Association of Respiratory Care International Congress event.

Archived College News